Machine Ghost

Update

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I’ve been busily chugging away on my QE preface/list, and for all of you out there wondering what I’ve been up to lately, here it is… (I didn’t bother fixing the italics, so just imagine the book titles slanted.)

Kimberly Lacey
Qualifying Exam Preface and List
Committee: Dr. Richard Marback (Director), Dr. Jeff Pruchnic, Dr. Richard Grusin
October 2008
This Qualifying Exam Preface and List will help formulate a dissertation project that investigates the intersection of two critically important, although arguably quite different, areas in the field of Rhetoric and Composition: ancient rhetoric and digital media.  While interdisciplinarity is particularly and frequently the case in the field of Rhetoric and Composition, and although studying rhetoric alone is a sufficient enough task, I find that fusing rhetoric with contemporary topics in digital media will be a reinvigorating venture. In order to pursue this interest, I wish to take my Qualifying Exam in the following three areas: the History of Rhetoric and Memory Studies, Digital Media, and Rhetorical and Critical Theory. The first section on the History of Rhetoric and Memory Studies provides a genealogic study of the rhetorical tradition with an emphasis upon recent work in memory.  The section on Digital Media contributes a specific technological vocabulary, articulating my converging interest in technology and memory. The titles in this portion of my list will also illustrate the development and history of digitization, as well as the current importance of technologies in everyday use.  Finally, in the area of Rhetorical and Critical Theory, I have included titles that will provide a broad overview of the current issues in the field of rhetoric, and also titles that theorize on matters of writing with technology.
Throughout the late twentieth-century, rhetoric has repeatedly entangled itself with various other disciplines.  During the sixties, rhetoric (with composition) was largely positioned as merely a service-oriented discipline, focusing considerable effort on first-year composition, while slowly developing its roots as the critical study of persuasion.  Some twenty years later, rhetoric was intertwined with poststructuralist theory and the “linguistic turn” in the humanities, causing rhetorical theory to gain new prominence by focusing on the persuasive power of discourses and institutions.  More specifically, given my research interests, memory also played a crucial role.  Foucault’s work on historical memory, Derrida’s influential critique of Platonic memory in “Plato’s Pharmacy,” and Lyotard’s reconsideration of information and memory’s impact on the grand narratives of knowledge of all showcase that rhetoric is malleable and constantly resurfacing in different arenas of the discipline.  Then in the early nineties, rhetoric found itself embroiled in the so-called “Science Wars,” most notoriously recognized by Alan Sokol’s faux-publication in Social Text.  For rhetoricians, the “Science Wars” questioned how academics in subjective humanities theorized concretely objective fields in hard sciences by offering various persuasive critiques of scientific models.  Insisting that the use of rhetorical appeals will encourage new and different interpretations of the evidence, rhetoricians argue that scientific discoveries are oftentimes inherently persuasive.  As witnessed in anthologies such as Alan Gross and William Keith’s Rhetorical Hermeneutics: Invention and Interpretation in the Age of Science, rhetoric’s complicated role in the “Science Wars” is still unsettled.  As a result, today’s rhetoricians rely heavily and frequently upon pre-modern rhetorical theory to “do” contemporary postmodern studies; and in this Preface and List, I am localizing the use of rhetoric to think through issues of memory and technology. Therefore, my project is largely expected to be an intervention foregrounding the importance of rhetorical memory in and after postmodern theory, while also relating to contemporary new media and information technology.
As a student in the field of Rhetoric and Composition, my research inquiry focuses on two notable moments in the rhetoric’s interdisciplinary history: the prominent role of rhetoric in humanist approaches to the theorizing of science and technology, and rhetoric in postmodern and poststructuralist critical theory.  Ultimately, I am interested in the modern transformation of the canon of memory, witnessed through its combination with digital media.  Amongst Cicero’s five canons of rhetoric (memory, delivery, invention, arrangement, and style), memory is clearly the most distinct link between ancient rhetoric and the advancement of information technology as we see it today (Bizell and Herzberg 195).  In contemporary rhetoric, interest in memory is not simply being characterized as memorization techniques or retaining information in bulk, but rather it is specifically focused on how efficiently we use external storage apparatuses. As cognitive psychologist Merlin Donald argues, external symbolic storage not only increases our brain capacity because we are “displacing” the brain, but we are simultaneously creating the space for additional creative activities.  If dependence upon external devices such as Blackberries, personal computers, flash drives, and GPS all suggest an extension of our brain capacity, the critical question to ask is whether remembering, memorizing, and recalling are all affected by outsourcing.   However, external storage is not dissimilar to the memory loci of the ancient rhetors, defined by Cicero among others as places where an orator would “store” parts of his speech and through which he could later “walk” and remember an oration in any particular order (Yates 2).  However, rather than being characterized by a good memory, the defining quality of today’s student  “is the capacity to actualize the relevant data for solving a problem ‘here and now,’ and to organize that data into an efficient strategy” (Lyotard 51).  Strong intellect is more frequently demonstrated by the ability to locate, store, and retrieve information efficiently and accurately—the more quickly one can find necessary data, the more productive the individual is likely to become.
However, the current state of accumulation, storage, and retrieval of memories is in many ways also different from the aforementioned memory loci. “Whereas oral-mythic cultures relied heavily on individual biological memory,” Donald writes, “modern cultures rely much more on external memory devices. […]  The architecture of the individual mind must change in a fundamental way” (273).  Unlike Simonides, who remembered a gathering of dinner guests with his mere mental capabilities, knowledge and memory are now measured by one’s ability to access material located externally. This shift toward externalization does not, however, support some popular theses that technology is ‘dumbing down’ knowledge, but rather “imposes search strategies, new storage strategies, new memory access routes, new options in both the control of and analysis of one’s own behavior” (Donald 19).
Because I am especially interested in the intersection of rhetoric and digital memory, the first part of my list, History of Rhetoric and Memory Studies, provides a penetrating look at their co-development. My list includes a comprehensive view of classical rhetoricians such as Cicero, Aristotle, Plato, Isocrates, and Quintilian, all defining rhetoric and memory slightly differently.  While Quintilian insists that writing—or for my purposes here, externalizing—destroys the memory, other texts on my list, notably Mary Carruthers’ The Book of Memory, Jose van Dijck’s Mediated Memories, Merlin Donald’s Origins of the Modern Mind, and Jean-Francois Lyotard’s The Postmodern Condition argue on the contrary by pointing out how much more we can “remember” when we externalize.  Frances Yates’ sweeping and thorough treatment of memory in The Art of Memory is a foundational source, highlighting the evolution of memory, beginning with Greek and Roman rhetoricians, and continuing beyond the Renaissance.  While Yates’ text introduces the early influences of rhetoric and memory, many recent texts are equally beneficial.  Kathleen Welch’s Electric Rhetoric links the practices of classical orators along with the burgeoning interest in digitality, responding to Marshall McLuhan’s and Walter Ong’s attention to the combination of new media and orality.  Gilles Deleuze’s Cinema 2 and Proust and Signs articulate some of the secondary forces behind memory—time and progression, while Jacques Derrida’s Archive Fever investigates the merits and limitations of digital chronicles, such as e-mails.
My second section, Digital Media, proceeds to elucidate the development and history of information technology as well as the current importance of digital media in everyday use.  As the catalyst of media theory, Marshall McLuhan is well represented on my list with the titles The Gutenberg Galaxy, Understanding Media, The Medium is the Message, and The Global Village.  Intensely focused on the means of persuasion, McLuhan’s work could just as easily fit into the earlier section, but his influence on this particular subject and in other works, such as Walter Ong’s Orality and Literacy, is noteworthy.  Following McLuhan and Ong, Donna Haraway’s “Cyborg Manifesto” is a crucial inclusion on my list; Haraway’s examination of the human and machine blend compliments my interest in the current state of memory as a result of this combination.  Some recent examples build upon Haraway’s legacy of the cyborg, situating it in various stages of “life”: in How We Became Posthuman, N. Katherine Hayles argues that with the rise of the cyborg, the body has not disappeared, but instead a new subjectivity has emerged; Ann Weinstone’s Avatar Bodies questions what changes when human-to-human interactions occur purely through digital interfaces; and finally, Richard Doyle’s Wetwares! examines human subjectivity beyond death with cyronics, the freezing of a body to be reawakened in the future.
The final section, Rhetorical and Critical Theory, provides a general framework for critical theory with emphasis on its application to writing with technology and digital media.  Chapter nine from Fredric Jameson’s Postmodernism, “Nostalgia for the Present,” captures some of the challenges with digital memory when questioning what is real and what is mere appearance (280).  With digital memories, the distinction between reality and appearance is critical, and texts such as Jean Baudrillard’s Simulacra and Simulation, Hannah Arendt’s The Human Condition, Erich Auerbach’s Mimesis, and Walter Benjamin’s “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” are all fundamental sources for distinguishing between the two concepts.  Slavoj Zizek in The Plague of Fantasies is equally intrigued by how real, affective responses are possible when digital interfaces, such as internet pornography, are utilized for pleasure.  Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s Empire interrogates the increasingly unbounded aspects of immaterial and affective labor, all peaking in connection with information technologies.  To round out this section of my list, I have included titles such as I.A. Richards’ The Philosophy of Rhetoric, two Michel Foucault anthologies, Aesthetics, Method, and Epistemology and Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth, as well as texts from Kenneth Burke, Henri Bergson, and Michel de Certeau.
Following the classical period, the other four canons of rhetoric have since prominently resurfaced, but arguably, memory has been sorely “forgotten.”  My dissertation, then, will accelerate beyond this list, focusing not only upon the ubiquitous utilization of external storage devices, but also questioning how the accessibility of stored information becomes an equally important stage in the re-canonization of contemporary memory.

Works Cited
Bizzell, Patricia and Bruce Herzberg, eds.  The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from
Classical Times to the Present.  Boston: Bedford St. Martin’s Press, 1990.
Deleuze, Gilles. Cinema 2: The Time Image. Trans. Hugh Tomlinson and Robert Galeta.
Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P,1989.
—.  Proust and Signs.  Trans. Richard Howard.  New York: George Braziller, 1972.
Derrida, Jacques.  Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression.  Chicago: U of Chicago P,
1998.
—.  Dissemination.  Trans. Barbara Johnson.  Chicago: U of Chicago Press,1981.
Donald, Merlin.  Origins of the Modern Mind: Three Stages in the Evolution of Culture
and Cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1991.
Doyle, Richard. Wetwares!: Experiments in Post-Vital Living. Theory out of Bounds 24.
Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2002.
Foucault, Michael.  “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History.”  The Foucault Reader.  Paul
Rabinow, ed. New York: Pantheon Books,  1984.
Gross, Alan G. and William M. Keith, eds.  Rhetorical Hermeneutics: Invention and
Interpretation in the Age of Science.  Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 1997.
Haraway, Donna. “Cyborg Manifesto.” Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: The Reinvention
of Nature. New York: Routledge, 1991.
Hayles, N. Katherine.  How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics,
Literature, and Informatics. Chicago, Ill. : University of Chicago Press, 1999.
Hardt, Michael, and Antonio Negri.  Empire. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2000.
Jameson, Fredric. Postmodernism, or, The Logic of Late Capitalism.  Durham, Duke UP:
1991.
Lyotard, Jean-Francois. The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge. Trans
Geoffrey Bennington and Brian Massumi. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1985.
Quinitilian. Institutio Oratorio. Trans. Donald Russell. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP,
2001.
Sokol, Alan D.  “Transgressing the Boundaries: Toward a Transformative Hermeneutics
of Quantum Gravity” Social Text, No. 46/47, Science Wars (Spring – Summer,
1996): 217-252).
Weinstone, Ann. Avatar Bodies: A Tantra for Posthumanism. Electronic Mediations 10.
Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2003.
Welch, Kathleen E. Electric Rhetoric: Classical Rhetoric, Oralism, and the New
Literacy. Digital Communication. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1999.
Yates, Frances A. The Art of Memory. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1966.
Zizek, Slavoj. The Plague of Fantasies.  New York: Verso, 1997.

Qualifying Exam List

History of Rhetoric and Memory Studies

Aristotle.  Rhetoric.  Trans. W Rhys Roberts.  New York: Modern Library, 1991.

Bacon, Francis. The Advancement of Learning. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1974.

Bergson, Henri.  Matter and Memory.  Trans. N.M. Paul and W.S. Palmer.  New York:
Zone Books,1991.

Boym, Svetlana. The Future of Nostalgia. New York: Basic Books, 2001.

Burgin, Victor. In/Different Spaces: Place and Memory in Visual Culture. Berkeley:
University of California P,1996.

Carruthers, Mary. The Book of Memory: A Study of Memory in Medieval Culture.
Cambridge UP, 2008.

Cicero.  De Oratore. Trans. James M. May and Jakob Wisse. New York, Oxford UP,
2001.

Cope, Bill and Mary Kalantzia, eds. Multiliteracies: Literacy Learning and the Design of
Social Futures. New York: Routledge, 2000.

Deleuze, Gilles. Cinema 2: The Time Image. Trans. Hugh Tomlinson and Robert Galeta.
Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P,1989.

—.  Proust and Signs.  Trans. Richard Howard.  New York: George Braziller, 1972

Derrida, Jacques.  Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression.  Chicago: U of Chicago P,
1998.

—.  Dissemination.  Trans. Barbara Johnson.  Chicago: U of Chicago Press,1981.

—.  Specters of Marx: The State of Debt, the Work of Mourning, and the New
International.  New York: Routledge, 1994.

–.  “White Mythology.”   Margins of Philosophy.  Trans. Alan Bass.  Chicago: U of
Chicago P, 1972.

Detienne, Marcel.  The Masters of Truth in Archaic Greece.  Trans. Janet Lloyd.  New
York: Zone Books, 1996.

De Quincey, Thomas. Confessions of an English Opium Eater. New York: Dutton, 1960.

Donald, Merlin.  A Mind So Rare: The Evolution of Human Consciousness.  New York:
W.W. Norton, 2001.

—.  Origins of the Modern Mind: Three Stages in the Evolution of Culture and
Cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1991.

Eisenstein, Elizabeth L.  The Printing Press as an Agent of Change: Communications
and Cultural Transformations in Early Modern Europe.  New York: Cambridge UP, 1979.

Freud, Sigmund.  The Interpretation of Dreams.  London: Penguin Books, 1950.

—. The Unconscious.  New York: Penguin Books, 2005.

Graff, Richard, Arthur E. Walzer, Janet M. Atwill, Eds.  The Viability of the Rhetorical
Tradition.  New York, SUNY Press, 2005.

Gross, Alan G. The Rhetoric of Science. Second ed. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1996.

—. “Rhetoric of Science without Constraints.” Rhetorica 9 (1991): 283-299.

—, and William Keith (eds). Rhetorical Hermeneutics: Invention and Interpretation in
the Age of Science. SUNY Series in Speech Communication. Albany: State U of New York P, 1997.

Isocrates. Isocrates I. Trans. David Mirhady and Yun Lee Too. Selections: “Encomium
to Helen,” “Against the Sophists,” “On the Team of Horses,” and     “Antidosis.”Austin: U of Texas P, 2000.

Jarratt, Susan C. Rereading the Sophists: Classical Rhetoric Refigured. Carbondale:
Southern Illinois UP, 1998.

Kastely, James L. Rethinking the Rhetorical Tradition: From Plato to Postmodernism.
New Haven, CO: Yale UP, 1997.

Kennedy, George. A New History of Classical Rhetoric.  Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP,
1994.

Kerferd, G. B. The Sophistic Movement. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge UP, 1981.

Kittler, Friedrich A. Discourse Networks 1800/1900. Trans. Michael Metteer with Chris
Cullens. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1990.

Koselleck, Reinhart.  Futures Past: On the Semantics of Historical Time.  Trans. Keith
Tribe. New York: Columbia UP, 2004.

Lacan, Jacques.  The Psychoses 1955-1956 (Seminar of Jacques Lacan).  Trans. Jacques-
Alain Miller, Russell Grigg.  New York: W. W. Norton, 1997.

Lakoff, George, and Mark Johnson. Metaphors We Live By. Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, 1980.

Llull, Ramon. Selected Works of Ramón Llull (1232-1316). Ed. and trans. by Anthony
Bonner. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton UP, 1985.

Locke, John.  An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Oxford: Clarendon Press,
1975.

Loraux, Nicole. The Invention of Athens: The Funeral Oration in the Classical City.
Trans. Alan Sheridan. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006

Lyotard, Jean-Francois. The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge. Trans
Geoffrey Bennington and Brian Massumi. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1985.

McComiskey, Bruce. Gorgias and the New Sophistic Rhetoric. Rhetorical Philosophy
and Theory. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2002.

Montaigne, Michel de. “Of Liars.” The Complete Works. Trans. Donald M. Frame.  New
York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2003. 25-30.

Olsen, Gary A. (ed.). Rhetoric and Composition as Intellectual Work. Carbondale:
Southern Illinois UP, 2002.

Ong, Walter.  Ramus, Method, and the Decay of Dialogue: From the Art of Discourse to
the Art of Reason. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1958.

Petraglia, Joseph.  Reality by Design: The Rhetoric and Technology of Authenticity in
Education. Mahwah, N.J.: L. Erlbaum, 1998.

Plato. “Gorgias.” Trans. W.D. Woodhead.  Plato: The Collected Dialogues.  Ed. Edith
Hamilton and Huntington Cairns.  Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1963.

—-. “Phaedrus.” Trans. Harold North Fowler. Plato I: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito,
Phaedo, Phaedrus. Ed. Harold North Fowler. Loeb Classical Library. Cambridge: Harvard Univeristy Press, 1990.

Poulakis, John. Sophistical Rhetoric in Classical Greece. Studies in
Rhetoric/Communication. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 1995.

Pseudo-Cicero. Rhetorica ad Herennium. Cambridge, Harvard UP, 1954.

Quinitilian. Institutio Oratorio. Trans. Donald Russell. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP,
2001.

Ramus, Peter. Arguments in Rhetoric against Quintilian. Trans. Carole Newlands.
Dekalb, IL: Northern Illinois UP, 1986.

Ricoeur, Paul.  Memory, History, Forgetting. Trans. Kathleen Blamey and David
Pellauer.  Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2006.

Rossi, Paolo. Logic and the Art of Memory: The Quest for a Universal Language. Trans.
Stephen Clucas. London: Continuum, 2000.

Soliday, Mary. The Politics of Remediation. Pittsburgh Series in Composition, Literacy,
and Culture. Pittsburgh: U of Pittsburgh P, 2002.

St. Augustin. On Christian Teaching. New York: Oxford UP, 1999.

Sprague, Rosamond Kent.  The Older Sophists: A Complete Translation By Several
Hands Of The Fragments In Die Fragmente Der Vorsokratiker, Edited By Diels-Kranz. With A New Edition Of Antiphon And Of Euthydemus Indianapolis : Hackett Pub., 2001.

Thebaud, Jean-Loup and Jean-Francois Lyotard.  Just Gaming.  Minnesota: U of
Minnesota P, 1985.

Van Dijck, José.  Mediated Memories in the Digital Age. Stanford, CA: Stanford
University Press, 2007.

Vickers, Brian. Classical Rhetoric in English Poetry.  Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois
UP, 1989.

Warnick, Barbara. Critical Literacy in a Digital Era: Technology, Rhetoric, and the
Public Interest. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2002.

Welch, Kathleen E. Electric Rhetoric: Classical Rhetoric, Oralism, and the New
Literacy. Digital Communication. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1999.

Wells, Susan.   Sweet Reason: Rhetoric and the Discourses of Modernity.  Chicago:
University of Chicago Press, 1996.

Yates, Frances A. The Art of Memory. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1966.

Digital Media

Ansell-Pearson, Kieth. Viroid Life: Perspectives on Nietzsche and the Transhuman
Condition. New York: Routledge, 1997.

Bolter, Jay David and Richard Grusin.  Remediation: Understanding New Media.
Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2000.

Burnett, Ron.  How Images Think. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2004.

Castells, Manuel. The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture. 3 vols. Malden,
Mass.: Blackwell, 1996-97. (Vol. 1: The Rise of the Network Society, pg. 1-25, 195-200; Vol. II: The Power of Identity, pg. 1-67).

Churchland, Patricia Smith. Neurophilosophy: Toward a Unified Knowledge of the Mind-
Brain. Computational Models of Cognition and Perception. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press,1986.

Connolly, William E. Neuropolitics. Theory out of Bounds 23. Minneapolis: U of
Minnesota P, 2002.

Doyle, Richard On Beyond Living: Rhetorical Transformations of the Life Sciences.
Writing Science. Stanford, CA: Stanford UP, 1997.

—. Wetwares!: Experiments in Post-Vital Living. Theory out of Bounds 24. Minneapolis:
U of Minnesota P, 2002.

Fahnestock, Jeanne. Rhetorical Figures in Science. New York: Oxford UP, 1999.

Fukuyama, Francis. Our Posthuman Future: Consequences of the Biotechnology
Revolution. New York: Picador, 2002.

Galloway, Alexander. Protocol: How Control Exists after Decentralization.  Cambridge,
MIT Press: 2004.

Gee, James Paul.  What Video Games Have to Teach Us about Learning and Literacy.
New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.

Gray, Chris Habl. Cyborg Citizen: Politics in the Posthuman Age. New York: Routledge,
2001.

Hansen, Mark B.N. Bodies in Code: Interfaces with Digital Media. New York:
Routledge, 2006.

—.  New Philosophy for New Media. Cambridge, MA. : MIT Press, 2004.

Haraway, Donna. “Cyborg Manifesto.” Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: The Reinvention
of Nature. New York: Routledge, 1991.

Hayles, N. Katherine.  How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics,
Literature ,and Informatics. Chicago, Ill. : University of Chicago Press, 1999.

—.  My Mother Was A Computer: Digital Subjects and Literary Texts. Chicago: U of
Chicago P, 2005.

Hocks, Mary E. and Michelle R. Kendrick, eds.  Eloquent Images: Word and Image in
the Age of New Media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003.

Johnson-Eilola, Johndan.  Datacloud : Toward a New Theory of Online Work.  Cresskill,
N.J.: Hampton Press, 2005.

Kirshenbaum, Matthew G.  Mechanisms: New Media and the Forensic Imagination.
Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2008.

Kittler, Friedrich. Grammophone, Film, Typewriter. Writing Science. Trans. Geoffrey
Winthrop-Young and Michael Wutz. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1999.

Kochlar-Lindgren, Gray.  Technologics: Ghosts, the Incalcuable, and the Suspension of
Animation. Albany: SUNY Press, 2005.

Kress, Gunther. Literacy in the New Media Age. Literacies. New York: Routledge, 2003.

Kuhn, Thomas S. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Third edition. Chicago: U of
Chicago P, 1996.

Lanham, Richard A. Electronic Word: Democracy, Technology, and the Arts. Chicago: U
of Chicago P, 1995.

Latour, Bruno. Pandora’s Hope: Essays on the Reality of Science Studies. Cambridge,
MA: Harvard UP, 1999.

—.  We Have Never Been Modern. Trans by Catherine Porter. New York: Harvester
Wheatsheaf, 1993.

Levy, Pierre. Becoming Virtual: Reality in the Digital Age. New York: Plenum, 1998.

Massumi, Brian.  Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation. Durham N.C.:
Duke UP, 2002.

McLuhan, Marshall.  The Gutenberg Galaxy; The Making of Typographic Man. Toronto:
U of Toronto P,1962.

—. Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1994.

— and Bruce R. Powers.  The Global Village: Transformations in World Life and Media
in the 21st Century. New York: Oxford UP, 1989.

— and Quentin Fiore.  The Medium Is the Message: An Inventory of Effects. San
Francisco, CA: HardWired, 1996.

Ong, Walter J. Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word. New York:
Routledge, 1988.

Piperno,  Franco.  “Technological Innovation and Sentimental Education.” Radical
Thought in Italy: A Potential Politics. Eds. Paolo Virno, Michael Hardt.  Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1996.

Shaviro, Steven. Connected, or, What It Means to Live in the Network Society. Electronic
Mediations 9. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2003.

Sobchack, Vivian.  Carnal Thoughts: Embodiment and Moving Image Culture. Berkeley:
U of California P, 2004.

Stengers, Isabelle. Power and Invention: Situating Science. Trans. Paul Bains. Theory out
of Bounds 19. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1997.

Steur, Jonathan. “Defining Virtual Reality: Dimensions Determining Telepresence.”
Journal of Communication 42(4) (1992): pg. 79-90.

Stone, Allucquère Roseanne. The War of Desire and Technology at the Close of the
Mechanical Age. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1995.

Suchman, Lucy A. Human-Machine Reconfigurations: Plans and Situated Actions.
Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press, 1987.

Wark, McKenzie. A Hacker Manifesto. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2004.

Wiener, Norbert. Cybernetics or Control and Communication in the Animal. 2nd ed. MIT
Press, 1965.

Weinstone, Ann. Avatar Bodies: A Tantra for Posthumanism. Electronic Mediations 10.
Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2003

Rhetorical and Critical Theory

Arendt, Hannah.  The Human Condition. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1998.

Auerbach, Erich. Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature.  Trans.
Willard R. Trask.  Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 2003.

Baudrillard, Jean. Simulacra and Simulation.  Trans. Sheila Faria Glaser. Ann Arbor: U
of Michigan P, 1995.

—. The Vital Illusion. Ed. Julia Witwer. New York: Columbia UP, 2000.

Benjamin, Walter. “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.”
Illuminations. Trans. Harry Zohn. New York: Schocken Books: 1968. 217-252.

Bergson, Henri. Creative Evolution. Trans. Arthur Mitchell. New York: Dover, 1998.

Burke, Kenneth. Counter-Statement. Second edition. Berkeley and Los Angeles: U of
California P, 1968.

—. Permanence and Change. Third edition. Berkeley and Los Angeles: U of California
P, 1984.

De Certeau, Michel. The Practice of Everyday Life. Trans. Steven Rendall. Berkeley: U
of California P, 1984.

De Landa, Manuel. Intensive Science and Virtual Philosophy. Transversals. New York:
Continuum, 2002.

Deleuze, Gilles. Coldness and Cruelty. Trans. Jean McNeil. New York: Zone, 1991.

—.  The Logic of Sense. Trans. Mark Lester.  New York: Columbia UP, 1990.

—, and Felix Guattari. Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. Trans. Robert
Hurley, Mark Seem, and Helen R. Lane. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2003.

Foucault, Michel. Aesthetics, Method, and Epistemology. Ed. James P. Faubion. Essential
Works of Foucault, 1954-184 2. Ed. Paul Rabinow. New York: New Press, 1997.

—. Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth. Essential Works of Foucault, 1954-184 1. Ed. Paul
Rabinow. New York: New Press, 1997.

—.  Fearless Speech.  Ed. Joseph Pearson.  Los Angeles: Semiotext(e), 2001.

Glen, Cheryl. Unspoken: A Rhetoric of Silence.  Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2004.

Hardt, Michael, and Antonio Negri.  Empire. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2000.

Jameson, Fredric. Postmodernism, or, The Logic of Late Capitalism.  Durham, Duke UP:
1991.

Nealon, Jeffrey T. Alterity Politics: Ethics and Performative Subjectivity. Durham, NC:
Duke UP, 1998.

—.  Foucault Beyond Foucault: Power and Its Intensifications Since 1984. Stanford, CA:
Stanford UP, 2008.

Negri, Antonio. Political Descartes: Reason, Ideology and the Bourgeois Project. Verso,
2007.

Richards, I. A. The Philosophy of Rhetoric. New York: Oxford UP, 1964.

Stiegler, Bernard.  Technics and Time, 1: The Fault of Epimetheus.  Trans. Richard
Beardsworth and George Collins.  Stanford: Stanford UP, 1998.

Virno, Paolo. A Grammar of the Multitude: For an Analysis of Contemporary Forms of
Life. Cambridge, MA: Semiotext(e), 2003.

Walker, Jeffrey. Rhetoric and Poetics in Antiquity. New York: Oxford UP, 2000.

Zizek, Slavoj. The Plague of Fantasies.  New York: Verso, 1997.

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Written by kimlacey

October 6, 2008 at 4:28 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

2 Responses

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  1. Just kind of skimming at present, but looks cool, Lacey.

    Btw, you’ve misspelled Sokal.

    Berube’s got a pretty solid read of the Sokal Hoax in Rhetorical Occasions, also btw.

    MLM

    Mike

    October 8, 2008 at 10:47 am

  2. Ha ha no one caught the misspelling! Oh, well. It’s too late.

    krlacey

    October 8, 2008 at 1:09 pm


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